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a man looking out wondering what is psychotherapy

What is Psychotherapy and How Does It Help You?

You’re experiencing emotional problems lately, and you need the know what is psychotherapy and the different ways that it can help you recover. This treatment option can help those with addictions and those who simply have emotional problems. So you may want to consider this care for yourself or addiction treatment for a loved one if this occurs to them.

What is Psychotherapy?

Psychotherapy, sometimes known as “talk therapy,” has been a working psychological counseling method for nearly a century. This method focuses on talking with a person and helping them understand their problems. Any psychological session you’ve seen on television or in movies was likely psychotherapy. People get psychotherapy for many reasons, including:

  • Trauma – Traumatic situations, such as the death of a loved one, may require psychotherapy to manage
  • Emotional issues – Many people feel deep psychological problems that require psychotherapy to manage
  • Stress and anxiety – Short-term stress and anxiety may require psychotherapy to overcome
  • Addiction problems – Those with addiction often need psychotherapy to understand their impulses
  • Family fights – Families often need group psychotherapy to understand their deep issues

So, what is psychotherapy? It is a powerful way to overcome many types of emotional problems. Over the years, this method has changed in many ways. New concepts have helped therapists better understand psychological issues. However, the core method remains the same – you talk to somebody about your problems. But how does merely talking help manage these concerns?

How Does Psychotherapy Work?

When learning more about the question “what is psychotherapy?” you must also understand how it works. Typically, a counselor works to find underlying issues affecting a person’s mental health. Once identified, the counselor can help patients understand more about how these problems affect them.

In many cases, people find that their actions and beliefs are based on a misunderstanding or misconception. They may think that people don’t like them, for example, when most people do like them. However, this belief feeds their behavior and causes them to alienate friends through a variety of different actions. Psychotherapy helps to find these behaviors and manage them.

Individuals can also learn various relaxation and mindfulness techniques to manage stress. These methods help to calm the mind and body from anxiety. In some cases, some patients may need medications and behavioral adjustment techniques to recover. These will all be discussed with the psychotherapist to ensure that you can heal properly. And addiction treatment hinges heavily on this type of care.

Does Psychotherapy Work?

Psychotherapy has nearly a century of evidence to back up its effectiveness. Studies find that psychotherapists work as a sounding board against which a person can work through issues. A good therapist is objective and tries to steer the conversation. The idea is to let the client come to conclusions for themselves. In this way, they have a better chance of fully understanding the situation.

As a result, it may not seem like your therapist is doing much of anything. However, they are carefully helping you make important personal realizations. These include understanding why you feel the way you feel and any addiction triggers that may affect your life. Therefore, you can beat addiction and regain your healthy sober lifestyle.

Who Can Provide Psychotherapy?

If you need help understanding “what is psychotherapy?” please contact us at Five Palms. Our experts have years of experience working with mental health problems. You can call us at 1.844.675.1022 to speak to our counselors about PTSD, depression, anxiety, and personality disorder treatment. And you can use our online insurance verification tool to ensure that you can afford to get care.

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